We Are the Weather

http://www.e-flux.com/journal/45/60131/we-are-the-we- ather/

Weather is the key paradox of our time. Weather that is nice is often weather that is wrong. The nice is occurring in the immediate and individual, and the wrong is occurring systemwide.

—Roni Horn in 20071

The sublime of the nineteenth century was described by Kant as the feeling of watching an avalanche from a distance. A glacier crumbles, a frozen world breaks down, creating awe and shock and awe again, pleasure and horror at the same time—but always at a remove. Today the sublime of the nineteenth century has gone haywire. It’s more like a monster wave. A tsunami as freeze frame. A twister exhaling in slow motion, collapsing a block of South Asian textile factories. A mo- ment of exhilarated foam suspended high up then crashing down to devastate your lives terminally. The razor-sharp spike of an algorithm when it crests, just barely high enough to brush up against the inside of the bubble.

The distance between the observer and the disaster has disappeared. In fact the observer and the disaster might even be the same thing. It’s as if when one bubble bursts, another one expands to become the atmosphere itself. We are standing above the remains and the rubble of the first, but still inside another enclosure that arrives as some sort of psychotic causality. Is there a way out of the market or are we only trapped inside with no escape? Yes and yes! The trouble has to do with being liberated and newly imprisoned in such quick succession. You are watching the storm and being blown and carried away by it at the same time. This is why you may often feel that you’re in com- petition with yourself, or that you are not yourself at all. You may be a wanderer above the mist, but you are also in the mist.2 The Cas- par David Friedrich painting went gray. You think you may be God himself, but you still need Google Maps to find your way through the mist. The wanderer lost his phone and is just trying to get to a restau- rant.

Walid Raad, Let’s Be Honest, The Weather Helped (Egypt), (1984-2007). Archival inkjet print. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York.

In the aftermath of the financial crisis, Wall Street firms made some very interesting adjustments. It is well known that after slashing
jobs by the thousands, salaries and bonuses for individual executives reached record highs. But how is this possible? Did executives simply stuff their own pockets with bailout money? Well, yes, but only th- rough a much larger systemic adjustment by which Wall Street firms essentially diverted money away from infrastructure and support staff, clearing the way for a slimmer workforce of highly gifted, self-suffi- cient, and well-paid geniuses.

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Thanks to Hito Steyerl.

Brian Kuan Wood is a writer and editor of e-flux journal.
© 2013 e-flux and the author